Why do moon landing conspiracies live on?

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PHOTOS: Major moon landing hoax myths explained

Even nearly 50 years on there is a not-so-small faction of people who believe that man never visited the moon and that the whole thing was faked from Apollo 11 until Apollo 17. 

Click through to read why some of the myths just aren’t true… 

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PHOTOS: Major moon landing hoax myths explained

Even nearly 50 years on there is a not-so-small faction of people who believe that man never visited the moon and that the whole thing was faked from Apollo 11

… more

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Myth: “Only two men supposedly walked on the moon but who was taking the pictures, smart guy?”

Yeah, but: Cameras were mounted to the astronauts’ chests. Also, the Lunar Module had a camera on the outside of it.

Myth: “Only two men supposedly walked on the moon but who was taking the pictures, smart guy?”

Yeah, but: Cameras were mounted to the astronauts’ chests. Also, the Lunar Module had a camera on the outside of it.

Photo: HOPD

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Myth: “The astronauts would have been cooked by the radiation from the Van Allen belt. They totally didn’t leave Earth.” 

(The Van Allen Belts come from the Earth’s magnetic field, and help protect the planet from dangerous solar radiation. That’s good.) 

Yeah, but: NASA says that the spacecraft’s coating weathered the burst of radiation as they powered towards the moon. Even then the astronauts were inside the belt for maybe only four hours in total. 

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Myth: “The astronauts would have been cooked by the radiation from the Van Allen belt. They totally didn’t leave Earth.” 

(The Van Allen Belts come from the Earth’s magnetic field, and help protect the planet

… more

Photo: NASA

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Myth: “The American flag was flapping in what looked like a breeze. There is no wind on the moon.” 

Yeah, but: This was because inertia exists and when the flag pole was being stuck into lunar dust it moved, which could look like it was being windblown. 

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Myth: “The American flag was flapping in what looked like a breeze. There is no wind on the moon.” 

Yeah, but: This was because inertia exists and when the flag pole was being stuck into lunar dust it moved,

… more

Photo: NASA

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Myth: “There wasn’t an impact crater.” 

Yeah, but: Moon dust particles don’t act like sand on Earth, which would be comparable. They stick together and hold their shape, NASA, since its all in a vacuum. Also, the lander’s engines were throttled back so the landing wasn’t so dramatic. 

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Myth: “There wasn’t an impact crater.” 

Yeah, but: Moon dust particles don’t act like sand on Earth, which would be comparable. They stick together and hold their shape, NASA, since its all in a vacuum. Also,

… more

Photo: NEIL A. ARMSTRONG, HO

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This explanation also covers those who say there wouldn’t be well preserved footprints like this one. Moon dust is not like Earth dust. Also below that dust is a hard layer of rock. 

This explanation also covers those who say there wouldn’t be well preserved footprints like this one. Moon dust is not like Earth dust. Also below that dust is a hard layer of rock. 

Photo: HO, NASA

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Myth: “No stars! No moon landing.” 

Yeah, but: According to National Geographic, the moon’s surface reflects sunlight in such a way the glare would have made the stars invisible to the cameras. Fast exposure settings also were a culprit. 

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Myth: “No stars! No moon landing.” 

Yeah, but: According to National Geographic, the moon’s surface reflects sunlight in such a way the glare would have made the stars invisible to the cameras. Fast exposure

… more

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Myth: “Too many shadows. That had to be the work of hot studio lights.” 

Yeah, but: There are multiple light sources on the moon, from the sun, light reflected off our Earth, and even light reflecting from the NASA equipment, lander, and space suits. 

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Myth: “Too many shadows. That had to be the work of hot studio lights.” 

Yeah, but: There are multiple light sources on the moon, from the sun, light reflected off our Earth, and even light reflecting from the

… more

Photo: Anonymous, HOGP

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Myth: “The moon’s surface is like 280 degrees and all those dudes would have melted not to mention the film they shot.” 

Yeah, but: The film was placed in special canisters to protect them from the elements. Plus the astronauts were on the moon at optimal times, between lunar dawn and dusk, meaning it wouldn’t be too hot or cold. 

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Myth: “The moon’s surface is like 280 degrees and all those dudes would have melted not to mention the film they shot.” 

Yeah, but: The film was placed in special canisters to protect them from the elements.

… more

Photo: NEIL ARMSTRONG, HO

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Myth: “Those space suits would be hard to use on the moon. Plus, they would have burned up since air conditioning doesn’t work there.” 

Yeah, but: The space suits were pressurized to ensure that the two astronauts could work (and play) on the moon. The space suits were also cooled in such a way that they could work only in space and nowhere else.  

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Myth: “Those space suits would be hard to use on the moon. Plus, they would have burned up since air conditioning doesn’t work there.” 

Yeah, but: The space suits were pressurized to ensure that the two

… more

Photo: Eric Long, HOGP

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Myth: “I can’t see anything left on the moon through my high-powered telescope.” 

Yeah, but: As National Geographic notes, there isn’t a telescope here on Earth that could do such a thing, though it would be pretty cool to see all the junk we’ve left behind. 

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Myth: “I can’t see anything left on the moon through my high-powered telescope.” 

Yeah, but: As National Geographic notes, there isn’t a telescope here on Earth that could do such a thing, though it would be

… more

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Public Policy Polling likes to throw us a curve ball occasionally, with a survey that isn’t the usual Democrat vs. Republican election match-up.

The newest is some offbeat polling on public opinion on various political conspiracy theories. Here are PPP’s top ten — and then a few that are way, way out there.

1. 51 percent of voters believe that John F. Kennedy’s assassination was a conspiracy. less

Public Policy Polling likes to throw us a curve ball occasionally, with a survey that isn’t the usual Democrat vs. Republican election match-up.

The newest is some offbeat polling on public opinion on various … more

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2. 44 percent of voters believe that George W. Bush intentionally lied about Iraq possessing weapons of mass destruction in order to lead the nation to war against Saddam Hussein.

Colin Powell warns the UN that Iraq could have anthrax in the lead up to the war. less

2. 44 percent of voters believe that George W. Bush intentionally lied about Iraq possessing weapons of mass destruction in order to lead the nation to war against Saddam Hussein.

Colin Powell warns the UN that … more

Photo: Elise Amendola, AP

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3. 37 percent of voters believe global warming is a hoax.

Climate researcher Michael Mann’s data on warming became a major point of debate for skeptics of global warming.

3. 37 percent of voters believe global warming is a hoax.

Climate researcher Michael Mann’s data on warming became a major point of debate for skeptics of global warming.

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4. 29 percent of voters believe aliens exist and that governments around the world are covering up evidence of it.

Photo of crop circles. (AP Photo)

4. 29 percent of voters believe aliens exist and that governments around the world are covering up evidence of it.

Photo of crop circles. (AP Photo)

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5. 28 percent of voters believe secretive power elite with a globalist agenda is conspiring to eventually rule the world through an authoritarian one-world government, the New World Order (as enunciated by the first President George Bush).

Conspiracy theorists have long pointed to the pyramid on the dollar bill as an Illuminati symbol. less

5. 28 percent of voters believe secretive power elite with a globalist agenda is conspiring to eventually rule the world through an authoritarian one-world government, the New World Order (as enunciated by the … more

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6. 28 percent of voters believe Saddam Hussein was involved in the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

The flip-side of the theory that George W. Bush intentionally lied. Saddam at his trial in Iraq (AP Photo).

6. 28 percent of voters believe Saddam Hussein was involved in the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

The flip-side of the theory that George W. Bush intentionally lied. Saddam at his trial in Iraq (AP Photo).

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7. 21 percent of voters say the U.S. government for more than six decades has covered up a UFO crash in Roswell, N.M.

A 1947 Newspaper helped launched the conspiracy theory, and Roswell has since profited on tourism based around the event. less

7. 21 percent of voters say the U.S. government for more than six decades has covered up a UFO crash in Roswell, N.M.

A 1947 Newspaper helped launched the conspiracy theory, and Roswell has since profited on … more

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8. 20 percent of voters believe the government is hiding a link between childhood vaccines and autism.

Michele Bachmann said she subscribed to the theory when criticizing HPV vaccines as a contender for the Republican presidential nomination. (AP Photo) less

8. 20 percent of voters believe the government is hiding a link between childhood vaccines and autism.

Michele Bachmann said she subscribed to the theory when criticizing HPV vaccines as a contender for the … more

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9. 15 percent of voters say the government (or the corporate media) has added mind-controlling technology to TV signals.

Image from DeesIllustration.com

9. 15 percent of voters say the government (or the corporate media) has added mind-controlling technology to TV signals.

Image from DeesIllustration.com

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10. 14 percent of voters believe the CIA was instrumental in creating the crack cocaine epidemic of the 1980s in America’s cities.

Image of crack-cocaine (AP Photo)

10. 14 percent of voters believe the CIA was instrumental in creating the crack cocaine epidemic of the 1980s in America’s cities.

Image of crack-cocaine (AP Photo)

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Bonus: Here are a few others that didn’t quite make the list:

– 13 percent of voters think Barack Obama is the anti-Christ

Some thought the creators of the History Channel’s Bible mini-series were subscribers after casting a Satan who resembled the president. (AP Photo) less

Bonus: Here are a few others that didn’t quite make the list:

– 13 percent of voters think Barack Obama is the anti-Christ

Some thought the creators of the History Channel’s Bible mini-series were subscribers … more

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7% of voters think the moon landing was faked

A popular version of the theory says 2001: A Space Odyssey director Stanley Kubrick helped make the landing believable. (NASA photo)

7% of voters think the moon landing was faked

A popular version of the theory says 2001: A Space Odyssey director Stanley Kubrick helped make the landing believable. (NASA photo)

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6 percent of voters believe Osama bin Laden is still alive

(AP Photo)

6 percent of voters believe Osama bin Laden is still alive

(AP Photo)

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4 percent of voters say they believe “lizard people” control our societies by gaining political power.

4 percent of voters say they believe “lizard people” control our societies by gaining political power.

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And for a reality check: 2 percent of Texas Republicans think that Rick Perry should be their party’s presidential nominee in 2016. Gotta give it to the lizard people.

Rick Perry at a 2012 Republican presidential debate. Oops. (AP Photo) less

And for a reality check: 2 percent of Texas Republicans think that Rick Perry should be their party’s presidential nominee in 2016. Gotta give it to the lizard people.

Rick Perry at a 2012 Republican … more

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Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, stands on the lunar surface after the Apollo 11 moon landing on July 20, 1969. The Lunar Module is seen in the background.

Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, stands on the lunar surface after the Apollo 11 moon landing on July 20, 1969. The Lunar Module is seen in the background.

Photo: ASSOCIATED PRESS

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In this July 12, 1969, file photo, the spot on the moon where Apollo 11 astronauts will aim for in their landing in the first attempt by man to land on the moon is pointed out by Rocco Petrone, director of launch operations at the space complex, Cape Kennedy, Fla. less
In this July 12, 1969, file photo, the spot on the moon where Apollo 11 astronauts will aim for in their landing in the first attempt by man to land on the moon is pointed out by Rocco Petrone, director of … more

Photo: Jim Kerlin, AP

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Apollo astronauts listen to Deke Slayton, director of flight crew operations for historic Apollo 11 flight, right, as they have their pre-flight breakfast at Cape Kennedy, Florida, on July 16, 1969. From left, they are Command Module pilot Michael Collins, Command Pilot Neil A. Armstrong, William A. Anders, and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. Anders is a member of the Apollo 11 backup crew. less
Apollo astronauts listen to Deke Slayton, director of flight crew operations for historic Apollo 11 flight, right, as they have their pre-flight breakfast at Cape Kennedy, Florida, on July 16, 1969. From left, … more

Photo: Anonymous, ASSOCIATED PRESS

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Newsmen and neighbors gather in front of a mobile television unit at the home of Astronaut Michael Collins, near the Manned Spacecraft Center, July 16, 1969, Houston, Texas. They were gathered to watch the blastoff of the Saturn rocket carrying the Apollo 11 spacecraft on its way to the moon. less
Newsmen and neighbors gather in front of a mobile television unit at the home of Astronaut Michael Collins, near the Manned Spacecraft Center, July 16, 1969, Houston, Texas. They were gathered to watch the … more

Photo: Anonymous, ASSOCIATED PRESS

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In this July 20, 1969 file, photo, Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong steps down from the lunar module lander and becomes the first man to set foot on the moon. A huge shadow of the Lunar module is cast on the moon’s surface. The photo was made from 16mm color film and was taken with a Mauer camera at six and 12 frames per second. less
In this July 20, 1969 file, photo, Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong steps down from the lunar module lander and becomes the first man to set foot on the moon. A huge shadow of the Lunar module is cast on the … more

Photo: Anonymous, AP

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Astronaut Edwin Aldrin’s son, Andrew, signs an OK from the top of his treehouse. Apollo 11 video here.
Astronaut Edwin Aldrin’s son, Andrew, signs an OK from the top of his treehouse. Apollo 11 video here.

Photo: Tom Colburn, Houston Chronicle

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American servicemen pause on a downtown Saigon Street to read a local newspaper account of the Apollo 11 lunar landing, July 21, 1969, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. From left are Air Force. Sgt. Michael Chivaris, Clinton, Mass., Army Spec. 4 Andrew Hutchins, Middlebury, Vt.; Air Force Sgt. John Whalin, Indianapolis, Ind.; and Army Spec. 4 Lloyd Newton, Roseburg, Ore. less
American servicemen pause on a downtown Saigon Street to read a local newspaper account of the Apollo 11 lunar landing, July 21, 1969, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. From left are Air Force. Sgt. Michael Chivaris, … more

Photo: ASSOCIATED PRESS

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The president greets the crew at the White House on the 40th anniversary of the landing. The president said he recalled watching Apollo astronauts return to Hawaii after splashing down in the Pacific Ocean. He said he’d sit on his grandfather’s shoulders and “we’d pretend like they could see us as we were waving at folks coming home.” less
The president greets the crew at the White House on the 40th anniversary of the landing. The president said he recalled watching Apollo astronauts return to Hawaii after splashing down in the Pacific Ocean. He … more

Photo: Alex Brandon, AP

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Here’s who was on the rocket that day: Astronauts Neil Armstrong, left, Michael Collins, center, and Edwin A. Aldrin, are pictured in this 1969 Apollo II crew portrait. Apollo 11 video here.
Here’s who was on the rocket that day: Astronauts Neil Armstrong, left, Michael Collins, center, and Edwin A. Aldrin, are pictured in this 1969 Apollo II crew portrait. Apollo 11 video here.

Photo: AP

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This oblique photograph of the moon looks generally northwest into the Sea of Tranquility, projected landing site for the Apollo 11 astronauts. The lower (nearest) linear feature is the Cauchy Scarp. The upper linear feature is the Cauchy Rille. The prominent crater Cauchy lies between the rille and the scarp. This picture was made from the Apollo 8 spacecraft late December, 1968. less
This oblique photograph of the moon looks generally northwest into the Sea of Tranquility, projected landing site for the Apollo 11 astronauts. The lower (nearest) linear feature is the Cauchy Scarp. The … more

Photo: NASA, Associated Press

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In this July 5, 1969 file photo, Astronaut Neil Armstrong, left, the first man scheduled to walk on the moon, displays a plaque that will be attached to a landing leg of the lunar module descent stage and will be left on the moon by the Apollo 11 astronauts as Col. Edwin E. “Buzz” Aldrin, center, holds the Apollo 11 insigna at a news conference at the Space Center. Command Module pilot Lt. Col. Michael Collins is at right. less
In this July 5, 1969 file photo, Astronaut Neil Armstrong, left, the first man scheduled to walk on the moon, displays a plaque that will be attached to a landing leg of the lunar module descent stage and will … more

Photo: AP

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This photo shows Apollo 11 crew members, led by Neil Armstrong, heading for the van that will take them to the rocket for the launch to the moon. Apollo 11 video here.
This photo shows Apollo 11 crew members, led by Neil Armstrong, heading for the van that will take them to the rocket for the launch to the moon. Apollo 11 video here.

Photo: AP

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The launch control team watches in Cape Canaveral, Fla.

The launch control team watches in Cape Canaveral, Fla.

Photo: New York Times

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The Saturn V makes history. The launch is marked in the annals of time by a period that included two other key events: Sen. Edward Kennedy’s crash at Chappaquiddick (July 18) and Woodstock (Aug. 15). Apollo 11 video here. less
The Saturn V makes history. The launch is marked in the annals of time by a period that included two other key events: Sen. Edward Kennedy’s crash at Chappaquiddick (July 18) and Woodstock (Aug. 15). Apollo 11 … more

Photo: NASA

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The 3,817 ton ship rises from the earth. Who gave the order for ignition? Jack King, the “voice of Apollo.” Apollo 11 video here.
The 3,817 ton ship rises from the earth. Who gave the order for ignition? Jack King, the “voice of Apollo.” Apollo 11 video here.

Photo: AP

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Apollo 11 launches into orbit. Apollo 11 video here.
Apollo 11 launches into orbit. Apollo 11 video here.

Photo: NASA

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Astronaut Edwin Aldrin’s son, Andrew, with some neighborhood friends. Left to right: Mark Frantz (10), Charley Merrifield (11) and Andrew. Apollo 11 video here.
Astronaut Edwin Aldrin’s son, Andrew, with some neighborhood friends. Left to right: Mark Frantz (10), Charley Merrifield (11) and Andrew. Apollo 11 video here.

Photo: Tom Colburn, Houston Chronicle

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Berliners stand in front of a TV shop and look through the window to observe the start of the Apollo 11 space mission on television, June 16, 1969, Berlin, Germany.

Berliners stand in front of a TV shop and look through the window to observe the start of the Apollo 11 space mission on television, June 16, 1969, Berlin, Germany.

Photo: Edwin Reichert, ASSOCIATED PRESS

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A group of unidentified people gather around televisions in a Sears Dept. store in White Plains, N.Y. to watch the lift off of Apollo 11 on July 16, 1969.

A group of unidentified people gather around televisions in a Sears Dept. store in White Plains, N.Y. to watch the lift off of Apollo 11 on July 16, 1969.

Photo: ASSOCIATED PRESS

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Wives of the three Apollo 11 astronauts make a joint apperance today today at one of their homes near the Space Center in Houston as their husbands continued the historical flight to the moon. From left: Mrs. Neil A. Armstrong, whose husband is scheduled to be the first man to step on the moon; Mrs. Michael Collins and Mrs. Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. less
Wives of the three Apollo 11 astronauts make a joint apperance today today at one of their homes near the Space Center in Houston as their husbands continued the historical flight to the moon. From left: Mrs. … more

Photo: AP

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In this July 1969 file photo, most of Africa and portions of Europe and Asia can be seen in this spectacular photograph taken from the Apollo 11 spacecraft during its translunar coast toward the moon, during the month of July, 1969. Apollo 11 was already about 98,000 nautical miles from earth when this picture was made. less
In this July 1969 file photo, most of Africa and portions of Europe and Asia can be seen in this spectacular photograph taken from the Apollo 11 spacecraft during its translunar coast toward the moon, during … more

Photo: NASA, AP

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A View of the Apollo Command Module with Astronaut Michael Collins aboard as seen from the Lunar Module, July 20, 1969. Astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin in the LM have separated from Apollo 11 and prepare to go to the lunar surface. Moon terrain in background is the far side of the moon. less
A View of the Apollo Command Module with Astronaut Michael Collins aboard as seen from the Lunar Module, July 20, 1969. Astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin in the LM have separated from Apollo 11 and … more

Photo: Anonymous, ASSOCIATED PRESS

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Past Apollo mission astronaut Frank Borman talks about the successful lunar landing of Apollo 11 and of the future of the space missions during a news conference at the White House, July 20, 1969. Borman viewed the telecast from the moon with President Nixon. less
Past Apollo mission astronaut Frank Borman talks about the successful lunar landing of Apollo 11 and of the future of the space missions during a news conference at the White House, July 20, 1969. Borman viewed … more

Photo: JOHN DURICKA, ASSOCIATED PRESS

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The Apollo 11 Lunar Module ascent stage can be seen from the command service module during rendezvous in lunar orbit July 20, 1969. The large, dark-colored area in the background is Smith’s Sea, centered at 85 degrees east longitude and 2 degrees south latitude on the lunar near side, looking west as the Earth rises above the Lunar horizon. It was announced Thursday, March 5, 1998, that small, scattered pockets of ice have been found beneath the lunar surface by a robot survey spacecraft that has spent the last month mapping the moon. less
The Apollo 11 Lunar Module ascent stage can be seen from the command service module during rendezvous in lunar orbit July 20, 1969. The large, dark-colored area in the background is Smith’s Sea, centered at 85 … more

Photo: AP

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Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., lunar module pilot, descends steps of Lunar Module ladder as he prepares to walk on the moon, July 20, 1969. He had just egressed the Lunar Module. This picture was taken by Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, Commander, with a 70mm surface camera during the Apollo 11 extravehicular activity. less
Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., lunar module pilot, descends steps of Lunar Module ladder as he prepares to walk on the moon, July 20, 1969. He had just egressed the Lunar Module. This picture was taken by … more

Photo: NEIL A. ARMSTRONG, AP

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Apollo 11 Astronaut Neil Armstrong is shown making history as he climbs down the ladder from the lunar module (left photo) and a few seconds later becomes the first human to set foot on the moon (right photo). The photos were taken during a telecast back to earth of the history-making achievement. less
Apollo 11 Astronaut Neil Armstrong is shown making history as he climbs down the ladder from the lunar module (left photo) and a few seconds later becomes the first human to set foot on the moon (right photo). … more

Photo: AP

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In this , July 20, 1969 file photo, Apollo 11 Commander Neil Armstrong walks slowly away from the lunar module to explore the surface of the moon.

In this , July 20, 1969 file photo, Apollo 11 Commander Neil Armstrong walks slowly away from the lunar module to explore the surface of the moon.

Photo: AP

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In this July 20, 1969 file photo, Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, right, trudges across the surface of the moon leaving behind footprints. The U.S. flag, planted on the surface by the astronauts, can be seen between Armstrong and the lunar module. Edwin E. Aldrin is seen closer to the craft. The men reported the surface of the moon was like soft sand and they left footprints several inches deep wherever they walked. less
In this July 20, 1969 file photo, Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, right, trudges across the surface of the moon leaving behind footprints. The U.S. flag, planted on the surface by the astronauts, can be … more

Photo: AP

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Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin E. ‘Buzz’ Aldrin, the first men to land on the moon, plant the U.S. flag on the lunar surface, July 20, 1969. Photo was made by a 16mm movie camera inside the lunar module, shooting at one frame per second. less
Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin E. ‘Buzz’ Aldrin, the first men to land on the moon, plant the U.S. flag on the lunar surface, July 20, 1969. Photo was made by a 16mm movie camera inside the … more

Photo: AP

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This NASA handout photo taken on July 20, 1969 shows Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., lunar module pilot of the first lunar landing mission, posing beside the deployed United States flag during Apollo 11 Extravehicular Activity (EVA) on the lunar surface area called the Sea of Tranquility. With one small step off a ladder, Neil Armstrong, commander of the Apollo 11 mission, became the first human to set foot on the moon on July 20, 1969, before the eyes of hundreds of millions of awed television viewers worldwide. With that step, he placed mankind’s first footprint on an extraterrestrial world and gained instant hero status. The Lunar Module (LM) is on the left, and the footprints of the astronauts are clearly visible in the soil of the Moon. less
This NASA handout photo taken on July 20, 1969 shows Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., lunar module pilot of the first lunar landing mission, posing beside the deployed United States flag during Apollo 11 … more

Photo: HO, AFP/Getty Images

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In this July 20, 1969 file photo, a crowd watches, as the Apollo 11 crew lands on the moon, in Central Park, New York.

In this July 20, 1969 file photo, a crowd watches, as the Apollo 11 crew lands on the moon, in Central Park, New York.

Photo: Marty Lederhandler, AP

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A Japanese family watch their TV screen as President Richard Nixon is superimposed on a live TV Broadcast of the Apollo 11 astronauts salute from the Moon, July, 1969, Tokyo, Japan. The family is unidentified.

A Japanese family watch their TV screen as President Richard Nixon is superimposed on a live TV Broadcast of the Apollo 11 astronauts salute from the Moon, July, 1969, Tokyo, Japan. The family is unidentified.

Photo: AP

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In this July 20, 1969 file photo, a footprint left by one of the astronauts of the Apollo 11 mission shows in the soft, powder surface of the moon.

In this July 20, 1969 file photo, a footprint left by one of the astronauts of the Apollo 11 mission shows in the soft, powder surface of the moon.

Photo: Anonymous, AP

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Bikini clad hostesses of a Tokyo cabaret, led by their manager, shout “Banzai” cheers in Japanese, in front of the U.S. Embassy, July, 1969, Tokyo Japan. They were celebrating the successful landing of the Apollo 11 lunar module on the moon. The girls carry signs reading “Congratulation for successful landing on the Moon.” less
Bikini clad hostesses of a Tokyo cabaret, led by their manager, shout “Banzai” cheers in Japanese, in front of the U.S. Embassy, July, 1969, Tokyo Japan. They were celebrating the successful landing of the … more

Photo: ASSOCIATED PRESS

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Bikini clad hostesses of a Tokyo cabaret, led by their manager, shout “Banzai” cheers in Japanese, in front of the U.S. Embassy, July, 1969, Tokyo Japan. They were celebrating the successful landing of the Apollo 11 lunar module on the moon. The girls carry signs reading “Congratulation for successful landing on the Moon.” less
Bikini clad hostesses of a Tokyo cabaret, led by their manager, shout “Banzai” cheers in Japanese, in front of the U.S. Embassy, July, 1969, Tokyo Japan. They were celebrating the successful landing of the … more

Photo: ASSOCIATED PRESS

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A crowd gathers to watch the Apollo 11 crew land on the moon, July 20, 1969, Central Park, New York.

A crowd gathers to watch the Apollo 11 crew land on the moon, July 20, 1969, Central Park, New York.

Photo: Marty Lederhandler, ASSOCIATED PRESS

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This July 20, 1969 file photo released by NASA shows commander of the Apollo 11 mission Neil Armstrong of the US near the lunar lander and the US flag, taken by Apollo 11 astronaut Edwin E. “Buzz” Aldrin, Jr. on the surface of the Moon. With one small step off a ladder, Neil Armstrong became the first human to set foot on the moon on July 20, 1969, before the eyes of hundreds of millions of awed television viewers worldwide. With that step, he placed mankind’s first footprint on an extraterrestrial world and gained instant hero status. less
This July 20, 1969 file photo released by NASA shows commander of the Apollo 11 mission Neil Armstrong of the US near the lunar lander and the US flag, taken by Apollo 11 astronaut Edwin E. “Buzz” Aldrin, Jr. … more

Photo: NASA, AFP/Getty Images

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This July 20, 1969 file photo released by NASA shows Apollo 11 astronaut Edwin E. “Buzz” Aldrin, Jr. removing a scientific experiment from the Lunar Module “Eagle” during the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission. As an estimated 500 million people around the world waited with bated breath crowded around fuzzy television screens and radios, Armstrong stepped down the lunar module’s ladder and onto the lunar surface. “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind,” Armstrong intoned, his words slightly distorted by distance and communications equipment, in a phrase now etched forever into the history books. less
This July 20, 1969 file photo released by NASA shows Apollo 11 astronaut Edwin E. “Buzz” Aldrin, Jr. removing a scientific experiment from the Lunar Module “Eagle” during the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission. As … more

Photo: -, AFP/Getty Images

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Edwin Buzz Aldrin carries scientific experiments to a deployment site south of the lunar module Eagle. One experiment involved the inner composition of the moon, and another tried to determine the exact distance from Earth. Photo was taken by Neil Armstrong of the Apollo 11 mission in July 1969. From the book Full Moon (Knopf) by Michael Light. less
Edwin Buzz Aldrin carries scientific experiments to a deployment site south of the lunar module Eagle. One experiment involved the inner composition of the moon, and another tried to determine the exact … more

Photo: AP

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In this July 20, 1969 file photo provided by NASA, mission control personnel watch the moon walk by Apollo 11 astronauts, in Houston.

In this July 20, 1969 file photo provided by NASA, mission control personnel watch the moon walk by Apollo 11 astronauts, in Houston.

Photo: Anonymous, AP

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Picture taken by US astronaut Neil Armstrong of astronaut Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin conducting an experiment on the moon’s surface on July 20, 1969, during the Apollo XI space mission. As an estimated 500 million people around the world waited with bated breath crowded around fuzzy television screens and radios, Armstrong stepped down the lunar module’s ladder and onto the lunar surface on July 20, 1969. “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind,” Armstrong intoned, his words slightly distorted by distance and communications equipment, in a phrase now etched forever into the history books. less
Picture taken by US astronaut Neil Armstrong of astronaut Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin conducting an experiment on the moon’s surface on July 20, 1969, during the Apollo XI space mission. As an estimated 500 million … more

Photo: -, AFP/Getty Images

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In this July 1969 file photo, Astronaut Edwin Aldrin walks by the footpad of the Apollo 11 Lunar Module.

In this July 1969 file photo, Astronaut Edwin Aldrin walks by the footpad of the Apollo 11 Lunar Module.

Photo: NASA, AP

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Picture taken on July 20, 1969 shows astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, walking on the surface of the moon during the Apollo 11 extravehicular activity (EVA). Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong took this photograph with a 70mm lunar surface camera. With one small step off a ladder, commander of the Apollo 11 mission Neil Armstrong of the US became the first human to set foot on the moon on July 20, 1969, before the eyes of hundreds of millions of awed television viewers worldwide. With that step, he placed mankind’s first footprint on an extraterrestrial world and gained instant hero status. less
Picture taken on July 20, 1969 shows astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, walking on the surface of the moon during the Apollo 11 extravehicular activity (EVA). Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong took … more

Photo: NASA, AFP/Getty Images

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The Moon hangs high over the Neil Armstrong residence in El Lago, but when this picture was taken, Mrs. Janet Armstrong, her children, and a few friends were watching her husband, Neil and fellow astronaut Edwin Aldrin walk around on the surface of the Moon. less
The Moon hangs high over the Neil Armstrong residence in El Lago, but when this picture was taken, Mrs. Janet Armstrong, her children, and a few friends were watching her husband, Neil and fellow astronaut … more

Photo: Curtis McGee, Houston Chronicle

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In this July 20, 1969 file photo, Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, Apollo 11 commander, is seen inside the Lunar Module while the LM rested on the lunar surface. Astronauts Armstrong and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module Pilot, had already completed their extravehicular activity when this picture was made. less
In this July 20, 1969 file photo, Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, Apollo 11 commander, is seen inside the Lunar Module while the LM rested on the lunar surface. Astronauts Armstrong and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., … more

Photo: Anonymous, AP

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ThinkFilm provided this photo of (left to right) Neil Armstrong, Mike Collins and Buzz Aldrin after the July, 1969 Apollo 11 mission from “In the Shadow of the Moon.”

ThinkFilm provided this photo of (left to right) Neil Armstrong, Mike Collins and Buzz Aldrin after the July, 1969 Apollo 11 mission from “In the Shadow of the Moon.”

Photo: Anonymous, ASSOCIATED PRESS

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Dr. Bill Carpenter prepares skin swab containers in the mobile quarantine facility aboard the recovery ship USS Hornet, awaiting the return to Earth of the Apollo 11 astronauts, July 21, 1969. After their return, the astronauts will be isolated in the mobile quarantine facility aboard the Hornet. less
Dr. Bill Carpenter prepares skin swab containers in the mobile quarantine facility aboard the recovery ship USS Hornet, awaiting the return to Earth of the Apollo 11 astronauts, July 21, 1969. After their … more

Photo: Anonymous, ASSOCIATED PRESS

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The media surround Janet Armstrong, wife of astronaut Neil Armstrong.

The media surround Janet Armstrong, wife of astronaut Neil Armstrong.

Photo: Bill Thompson, Houston Chronicle

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This July 24, 1969 photo shows the re-entry of Apollo 11 into the earth’s atmosphere.

This July 24, 1969 photo shows the re-entry of Apollo 11 into the earth’s atmosphere.

Photo: ASSOCIATED PRESS

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Apollo 11 slashdown in the Pacific, July 24, 1969.

Apollo 11 slashdown in the Pacific, July 24, 1969.

Photo: ASSOCIATED PRESS

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U.S.Navy personnel, protected by Biological Isolation Garments, is recovering the Apollo 11 crew from the re-entry vehicle, which landed safely in the Pacific Ocean on July 24, 1969, after an eight day mission on the moon. less
U.S.Navy personnel, protected by Biological Isolation Garments, is recovering the Apollo 11 crew from the re-entry vehicle, which landed safely in the Pacific Ocean on July 24, 1969, after an eight day mission … more

Photo: ASSOCIATED PRESS

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US Navy pararescueman Lieutenant Clancey Hatleberg disinfects Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins, and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin in a life raft during recovery operations on July 24, 1969 at the successful completion of their lunar landing mission. less
US Navy pararescueman Lieutenant Clancey Hatleberg disinfects Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins, and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin in a life raft during recovery operations on July 24, 1969 at the … more

Photo: -, AFP/Getty Images

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In this 1969 file photo, Apollo 11 astronauts stand next to their spacecraft in 1969, from left to right: Col. Edwin E. Aldrin, lunar module pilot; Neil Armstrong, flight commander; and Lt. Michael Collins, command module pilot. less
In this 1969 file photo, Apollo 11 astronauts stand next to their spacecraft in 1969, from left to right: Col. Edwin E. Aldrin, lunar module pilot; Neil Armstrong, flight commander; and Lt. Michael Collins, … more

Photo: Anonymous, AP

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Apollo 11 crew leaving recovery helicopter, July 24, 1969.

Apollo 11 crew leaving recovery helicopter, July 24, 1969.

Photo: ASSOCIATED PRESS

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Misson control personnel wave flags to celebrate the the return to earth of Apollo 11 on July 24, 1969.

Misson control personnel wave flags to celebrate the the return to earth of Apollo 11 on July 24, 1969.

Photo: NASA, NYT

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Mrs. Edwin E. Aldrin (Joan) admitted to being tense during parts of the Apollo 11 mission, but she said Thursday, the day her husband splashed down, was different. Mrs. Aldrin and her children, from left, Janice, Michael and Andrew, held a hot but happy post-splashdown press conference. less
Mrs. Edwin E. Aldrin (Joan) admitted to being tense during parts of the Apollo 11 mission, but she said Thursday, the day her husband splashed down, was different. Mrs. Aldrin and her children, from left, … more

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In this July 24, 1969 file photo, President Richard Nixon, back to camera, greets the Apollo 11 astronauts in the quarantine van on board the U.S.S. Hornet after splashdown and recovery. The Apollo 11 crew from left: Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins, and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin. less
In this July 24, 1969 file photo, President Richard Nixon, back to camera, greets the Apollo 11 astronauts in the quarantine van on board the U.S.S. Hornet after splashdown and recovery. The Apollo 11 crew … more

Photo: AP

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Neil A. Armstrong, commander of the Apollo 11 flight, greets his son Mark on telephone intercom system, while his wife Jan and another son Eric look on. Armstrong had just arrived in early morning with the Mobile Quarantine Facility at Ellington Air Force Base. Armstrong and fellow astronauts will remain in the MQF until arrival and confinement in the Crew Reception Area of the Lunar Receiving Laboratory at the Manned Spacecraft Center. Quarantine period will end on August 10, 1969. less
Neil A. Armstrong, commander of the Apollo 11 flight, greets his son Mark on telephone intercom system, while his wife Jan and another son Eric look on. Armstrong had just arrived in early morning with the … more

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The Apollo 11 crew in their isolation trailer, left to right: Neil Armstrong; Edwin E. “Buzz” Aldrin and Michael Collins are greeted by their wives, left to right: Pat Collins; Jan Armstrong and Joan Aldrin after the spacemen arrived at Ellington AFB near the Manned Spacecraft Center, Houston, Tex. less
The Apollo 11 crew in their isolation trailer, left to right: Neil Armstrong; Edwin E. “Buzz” Aldrin and Michael Collins are greeted by their wives, left to right: Pat Collins; Jan Armstrong and Joan Aldrin … more

Photo: ASSOCIATED PRESS

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Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander of the historic Apollo 11 lunar landing mission and the first man to set foot on the Moon, blows out the candles on his birthday cake as he celebrates his 39th birthday while still confined to the Crew Reception Area of the Manned Spacecraft Center’s Lunar Receiving Laboratory. less
Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander of the historic Apollo 11 lunar landing mission and the first man to set foot on the Moon, blows out the candles on his birthday cake as he celebrates his 39th birthday … more

Photo: NASA

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In this Aug. 13, 1969 file photo, amid ticker tape and American flags, Apollo 11 astronauts wave to welcoming New Yorkers during parade up lower Broadway on Wednesday, in New York. The spacemen, from left, are Michael Collins, Edwin Aldrin, Jr., and Neil A. Armstrong. less
In this Aug. 13, 1969 file photo, amid ticker tape and American flags, Apollo 11 astronauts wave to welcoming New Yorkers during parade up lower Broadway on Wednesday, in New York. The spacemen, from left, are … more

Photo: Eddie Adams, AP

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This picture shows a display in honor of the Apollo 11 astronauts in a window of the Saks 5th Avenue store in New York in 1969.

This picture shows a display in honor of the Apollo 11 astronauts in a window of the Saks 5th Avenue store in New York in 1969.

Photo: ASSOCIATED PRESS

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Apollo 11 ticker tape parade in downtown Houston. Apollo 11 Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins, and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. parade through downtown Houston in August 16, 1969.

Apollo 11 ticker tape parade in downtown Houston. Apollo 11 Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins, and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. parade through downtown Houston in August 16, 1969.

Photo: Jerry Click, Houston Chronicle

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Michael Collins during a ticker tape parade in downtown Houston.

Michael Collins during a ticker tape parade in downtown Houston.

Photo: JERRY CLICK, HOUSTON CHRONICLE

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Neil Armstrong waves along with his wife and son from confetti-strewn car.

Neil Armstrong waves along with his wife and son from confetti-strewn car.

Photo: JERRY CLICK, HOUSTON CHRONICLE

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Main Street Houston – Astronaut Neil Armstrong, first man on the moon, waves to Houstonians who came by the thousands August 16, 1969 to cheer the Apollo 11 astronauts, Armstrong, Aldrin and Collins after their historic moon landing in July. less
Main Street Houston – Astronaut Neil Armstrong, first man on the moon, waves to Houstonians who came by the thousands August 16, 1969 to cheer the Apollo 11 astronauts, Armstrong, Aldrin and Collins after … more

Photo: JIM COKER, HOUSTON CHRONICLE

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Celebration for Apollo 11 astronauts at the Astrodome, August 1969.

Celebration for Apollo 11 astronauts at the Astrodome, August 1969.

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Pope Paul VI looks through a magnifying lens as he examines a microfilm of messages from world leaders, brought to the moon by the Apollo 11 astronauts, during an audience in the pontiff`s private studio for them and their wives, Oct. 16, 1969. Standing behind the Pope, in front row, are (l/r:) Michael Collins; Msgr. P. Conveney, acting as interpreter; Edwin Aldrin and Neil Armstrong. less
Pope Paul VI looks through a magnifying lens as he examines a microfilm of messages from world leaders, brought to the moon by the Apollo 11 astronauts, during an audience in the pontiff`s private studio for … more

Photo: Anonymous, ASSOCIATED PRESS

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President Jimmy Carter is shown at the White House with the Apollo 11 crew in July of 1979, left to right: Buzz Aldrin, Michael Collins, and Neil Armstrong.

President Jimmy Carter is shown at the White House with the Apollo 11 crew in July of 1979, left to right: Buzz Aldrin, Michael Collins, and Neil Armstrong.

Photo: ASSOCIATED PRESS

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Apollo astronauts, from left, Neil Armstrong, Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin, Gene Cernan, and Walter Cunningham hold a press conference in a replica of an Apollo control room at Kennedy Space Center, Fla. Friday July 16, 1999. The men were at the center to help celebrate the 30th anniversary of the Apollo 11 launch. less
Apollo astronauts, from left, Neil Armstrong, Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin, Gene Cernan, and Walter Cunningham hold a press conference in a replica of an Apollo control room at Kennedy Space Center, Fla. Friday July 16, … more

Photo: TERRY RENNA, ASSOCIATED PRESS

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Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, center, with fellow astronauts Edwin A. “Buzz” Aldrin, right, and Michael Collins, left, laugh Tuesday, July 20, 1999 at a ceremony in the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum in Washington, were they were presented the Langley Gold Medal for aviation by Vice President Al Gore. The event marks the 30th anniversay of the first landing on the moon by the three crew members. less
Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, center, with fellow astronauts Edwin A. “Buzz” Aldrin, right, and Michael Collins, left, laugh Tuesday, July 20, 1999 at a ceremony in the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum in … more

Photo: DOUG MILLS, ASSOCIATED PRESS

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Apollo 11 astronaut Edwin A. “Buzz” Aldrin is applauded by Vice President Al Gore after Gore presented him the Langley Gold Medal for aviation Tuesday, July 20, 1999 at a ceremony in the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum in Washington. The event marks the 30th anniversay of the first landing on the moon by the three Apollo 11 crew members. In the background is the original Apollo 11 capsule. less
Apollo 11 astronaut Edwin A. “Buzz” Aldrin is applauded by Vice President Al Gore after Gore presented him the Langley Gold Medal for aviation Tuesday, July 20, 1999 at a ceremony in the Smithsonian Air and … more

Photo: DOUG MILLS, ASSOCIATED PRESS

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President Clinton looks at a piece of moon rock presented to him by Apollo 11 crew members Michael Collins, left, Neil Armstrong, second left, and Edwin A. “Buzz” Aldrin, right, during a visit to the White House. Carol Armstrong, wife of Neil, third left, and Lois Aldrin, second right, wife of Buzz, joined the presentation. Tuesday marks 30th anniversary of the first landing on the moon, and the men of Apollo 11 received the prestigious Langley Gold Medal for aviation Tuesday, as well as, met with Clinton. less
President Clinton looks at a piece of moon rock presented to him by Apollo 11 crew members Michael Collins, left, Neil Armstrong, second left, and Edwin A. “Buzz” Aldrin, right, during a visit to the White … more

Photo: RON EDMONDS, ASSOCIATED PRESS

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U.S. President Barack Obama meets with Apollo 11 astronauts, from left, Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin, the second man to walk on the moon, Michael Collins, the command module pilot, and Neil Armstrong, who took the first step on the moon, in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S. Obama used the appearance with the astronauts to reinforce his call for greater emphasis on math and science in U.S. schools. less
U.S. President Barack Obama meets with Apollo 11 astronauts, from left, Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin, the second man to walk on the moon, Michael Collins, the command module pilot, and Neil Armstrong, who took the first … more

Photo: MARTIN SIMON, VIA BLOOMBERG

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